WHY IRONMAN?

For children living with epilepsy,
the chance to go to camp is extraordinary.

Camp is a rite of passage for many children. It’s a fun place to try new things, meet new friends and learn more about themselves. The most important thing camp offers to a child is that first taste of independence. For children with epilepsy, independence can seem like an unattainable dream and camp isn’t even part of the discussion.

We’re working to change that and you can help. With your donation, a child with epilepsy can have the same experience as their classmates but in a safe, non-judgmental environment.
Our Epilepsy Youth Summer Camp program provides all the trappings of a traditional summer camp – outdoor activities, campfire singalongs, sharing a cabin with new friends, and learning about life from counselors who have been there. What makes our camps special is that they’re staffed by medical professionals with epilepsy training who are there to administer medications, monitor symptoms and care for a child who might have a seizure during his stay.
That’s peace of mind for the parents.

For the campers, it’s an opportunity to be themselves and have fun, surrounded by kids who understand what it’s like to live with epilepsy.
The children we support have a lot to deal with on a daily basis, so it’s a great feeling to see them laughing, creating, enjoying nature as if they didn’t have a care in the world. Epilepsy camp allows these children to have one week a year, where all they have to think about is fun.

Please help us give even more kids the kind of experience so many take for granted. Sponsor a mile and send more kids to camp.

Through generous donations, the foundation is able to offer full and partial scholarships to many campers, based on financial need. Thank you to all the donors who have made camp possible for many children! Please consider making a donation to support more Epilepsy Camps.

Why Ironman?

To put it simply, to achieve what feels impossible while raising awareness for a very special group of people. I may be the one running, but I’m running on behalf of the millions of people living with epilepsy, and specifically the more than 180,000 that are in Northern California alone. I do not have epilepsy, but I know all about it thanks to Noah.

I was fortunate enough to be Noah’s caregiver for a few years. Before I met him, I knew very little about the neurological disorder, but once I stepped into his life, I quickly learned all about the impact epilepsy has on an individual’s daily life and the life of those who support them.

Noah is my hero and my inspiration. When I’m tired and aching, when I’m considering giving up, I remember every time that Noah got up from a fall, every time he sat still for stitches or continued playing through the scrapes and the blood.

When I worry about whether I’ll make it to the end of the race, I remember what it’s like for Noah and his family. They wake up every day knowing there are no for sures in life when you have epilepsy.

If I only took one thing away from my time with Noah (and believe me, I learned so much!) it’s that you need to keep reaching for the finish line even when you don’t think you’ll make it or think you’ll look like a fool trying.

When I worry about whether I’ll make it to the end of the race, I remember what it’s like for Noah and his family. They wake up every day knowing there are no for sures in life when you have epilepsy.

If I only took one thing away from my time with Noah (and believe me, I learned so much!) it’s that you need to keep reaching for the finish line even when you don’t think you’ll make it or think you’ll look like a fool trying.

I saw this when I did my first sprint triathlon with Noah and his dad in support of epilepsy awareness. It was an incredible experience! I found a new passion that I had in sports that I really enjoyed, but more importantly I learned that there is more work to be done for the epilepsy community.

Some people were confused about why we were even there. One woman actually complained that we were “in the way” during the race. None of that mattered, when I saw Noah’s dad Gregg push so hard to cross that finish line with his son!

Now, I’m ready for this new challenge. Ironman for Epilepsy is more than 140.6 miles. It is about the awareness that needs to happen, to end the stigma that surrounds epilepsy, and to make sure that inclusion is happening in all areas of life for people with epilepsy. I will be honest; this will not be easy for me. The training that needs to happen and the toll that it will take on my body, both physically and mentally will be a challenge. However, that is exactly why it needs to be done. 140.6 miles to cross that finish line. 140.6 miles of support for people like Noah and his family. 140.6 miles of donations that will allow us to open more camps for kids with epilepsy.

Noah showed me that anything is possible and to get back up when we are kicked down. I’m running for him and to get people talking about people like him. Ironman for Epilepsy will be 140.6 of the most important and meaningful miles of my athletic career.

“Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much” – Helen Keller

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